Preschool Math Activities

It is possible to nurture young minds by making them to go through mathematical activities at a very young age. By exposing the little minds to various activities like counting, number sequencing and patterns, it is possible to train up their minds. There are various kinds of activities and they should be chosen as per the age groups. If you go through online, you can access free as well as premium sites which offer preschool math activities.

Preschool Math Activitie

How to make the most from the activities?

It is possible to make the most from preschool math activities by exposing the little minds in a systematic way. They should not be overburdened by dumping too many exercises and making them to go through lessons which are beyond their capacity. All the activities should create interest in them. They should have fun with and every activity. If you include everyday aspects in these activities, it is very easy to grasp the concept. The child will be immersed in these activities automatically when you give proper direction and encouragement.


Some of the everyday examples are ‘counting of stairs’ at home or school. The ingredients that are used in the cooking process can be counted. You can ask the child to prepare groups of various kinds of items of play. Children can remember various kinds of shapes like circles, rectangles, squares and triangles and they will also be able to form a shape by joining various items together.


It is true that the ways math are taught today are completely different from yesteryears. There are drastic changes and children have ample opportunities to explore the real world in the way it is present. Instead of teaching only one way to solve mathematical puzzles, children are encouraged to explore new ways in an open way.

The role of teacher or trainer in delivering the right kind of education is very high. If the teacher is aware of the multiple ways through which a mathematical problem can be resolved, he will encourage students to come with various solutions. The teacher should be resourceful and willing to learn and implement new strategies so that the learning process will be more intuitive. If you ask a child about the way he got the answer to a particular mathematical issue, you will understand his or her way of thinking. Instead of teaching solutions, it is required to show the way to reach those solutions. When a proper platform is created to bring out the best present in children, it is possible to teach complex math in simple ways.

When the child’s mind is molded in a proper way, the child will be able to learn the basics in an appropriate way. The child should have lots of mathematical materials such as beads and blocks. They should be encouraged to use their fingers and the body to begin the counting journey. The physical surroundings should be treated in such a way so that an interesting atmosphere is created to learn mathematics subconsciously.

Enriching and Entertaining Preschool Math Activities

Mathematics make a sense of the physical world the children live in and hence preschool math activities make a strong case for their future learning abilities and reasoning. In all normal children, there is strong desire to calculate in their crude ways as well as reason out with objects and odd tools. These children even try to make their calculations while ascertaining distances, sizes and amount of a particular item or things. Many children count the number of stairs they have to climb while at home or school. Besides, they create their own shapes of things by selecting similar objects and place them next to the other. Even in their childhood fancies and little aspirations, they bring out numbers or their additions and subtractions with totally different ideas and their own unique out of the box techniques.

Preschool Math Activities

This is the time to explore their individual creativity and little guidance can go a long way in getting them to make headway into exploring the more entertaining and complex arrangement of numbers and the sizes and amount of different boxes and toys. In the modern world, there has been a paradigm shift in the presentation and evaluation of mathematical inclinations among children and this has brought in a new perspective into the preschool math activities of the children.

Benefitting from a strong start

Children nowadays have more attractive things and wider range of items to explore than was available in ancient days and it is here preschool math activities can benefit them. Teachers and parents can make the best out of the circumstances and encourage them to do their own calculations and arithmetic so as to bring out the best potential from them. Once they get this base they would undoubtedly generate more interest and start learning more of the formal math in the future.

Again, the new ways of learning math have become even more varied with possibilities of solution in several different ways and methods. For children this would be better as they would be explore these new ways and teachers can on their part make them more receptive to ideas and problem solving methods. Sometimes, even asking a few gentle questions like ‘how did you get that answer’ or ‘how did you manage it’ can make their learning even more challenging and enriching.

There are toys and tools that experience the cognitive abilities of children by giving them a run with their imagination as well meaningfully convey an understanding that would enable them to make out solutions on their own. It is usually seen that children start to wonder and grasp math in the age period of 1 & 2. Again, studies have revealed that children of 3 years start to enjoy and explore patterns and shapes as well as matching them while by 4 years they learn the early stages of geometry and counting during their preschool math activities.


Children if helped in their preschool math activities develop better mathematical skills than those who do not. Make sure you too engage your child in preschool math activities daily.

Turns out there’s a Michael Scott quote for every college major

Sit back, relax, and let Michael Scott sum up your college major.
Image: Chris Haston/NBC

The beloved Michael Scott parted ways from The Office in 2012, but his many legendary quotes are still celebrated to this day.

Daniel McCrystal, a clear fan of the NBC comedy, recently discovered that there’s a Michael Scott quote to perfectly sum up every college major, and WOW, it is something. 

From accounting and English, to dance and pre-dental, McCrystal tweeted each major alongside a corresponding Scott quote, and the results are truly mind-blowing.

Let me just warn you that seeing a Michael Scott quote beside a subject you devoted years of your life to mastering is very, very humbling. In some cases, these memes are depressing as hell, but they’re all brilliant.

Since there are quite a few majors, let’s review some of the most impressive, shall we?

I, an English major, was brought back to the usually ugly “Whoever vs. Whomever” debate. Very relatable.

And there’s even one for undeclared majors.

Check out the full thread to search for your own major, but if you don’t find it have no fear — McCrystal is taking recommendations.

Long live the almost always problematic words of Michael Scott.

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Secretary DeVos Announces New Support for Wildfire Impacted Schools in California

U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos announced today new federal assistance for students and schools impacted by the October 2017 California wildfires. The California Department of Education will receive $2 million in Project SERV funds to aid in their recovery efforts.

According to education officials in California, the award will specifically help to fund portable classrooms, substitute teachers, mental health services, transportation for displaced students and substitute bus drivers.

Stephen Hawking, a Physicist Transcending Space and Time, Passes Away at 76

For arguably the most famous physicist on Earth, Stephen Hawking—who died Wednesday in Cambridge at 76 years old—was wrong a lot. He thought, for a while, that black holes destroyed information, which physics says is a no-no. He thought Cygnus X-1, an emitter of X-rays over 6,000 light years away, wouldn’t turn out to be a black hole. (It did.) He thought no one would ever find the Higgs boson, the particle indirectly responsible for the existence of mass in the universe. (Researchers at CERN found it in 2012.)

But Hawking was right a lot, too. He and the physicist Roger Penrose described singularities, mind-bending physical concepts where relativity and quantum mechanics collapse inward on each other—as at the heart of a black hole. It’s the sort of place that no human will ever see first-hand; the event horizon of a black hole smears matter across time and space like cosmic paste. But Hawking’s mind was singular enough to see it, or at least imagine it.

His calculations helped show that as the young universe expanded and grew through inflation, fluctuations at the quantum scale—the smallest possible gradation of matter—became the galaxies we see around us. No human will ever visit another galaxy, and the quantum realm barely waves at us in our technology, but Hawking envisioned them both. And he calculated that black holes could sometimes explode, an image that would vex even the best visual effects wizard.

More than that, he could explain it to the rest of us. Hawking was the Lucasian Chair of Mathematics at Cambridge until his retirement in 2009, the same position held by Isaac Newton, Charles Babbage, and Paul Dirac. But he was also a pre-eminent popularizer of some of the most brain-twisting concepts science has to offer. His 1988 book A Brief History of Time has sold more than 10 million copies. His image—in an electric wheelchair and speaking via a synthesizer because of complications of the degenerative disease amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, delivering nerdy zingers on TV shows like The Big Bang Theory and Star Trek: The Next Generation—defined “scientist” for the latter half of the 20th century perhaps as much as Albert Einstein’s mad hair and German accent did in the first half.

Possibly that’s because in addition to being brilliant, Hawking was funny. Or at least sly. He was a difficult student by his own account. Diagnosed with ALS in 1963 at the age of 21, he thought he’d have only two more years to live. When the disease didn’t progress that fast, Hawking is reported to have said, “I found, to my surprise, that I was enjoying life in the present more than before. I began to make progress with my research.” With his mobility limited by the use of a wheelchair, he sped in it, dangerously. He proved time travel didn't exist by throwing a party for time travelers, but not sending out invitations until the party was over. No one came. People learned about the things he got wrong because he’d bet other scientists—his skepticism that Cygnus X-1 was a black hole meant he owed Kip Thorne of Caltech a subscription to Penthouse. (In fact, as the terms of that bet hint, rumors of mistreatment of women dogged him.)

Hawking became as much a cultural icon as a scientific one. For a time police suspected his second wife and one-time nurse of abusing him; the events became the basis of an episode of Law and Order: Criminal Intent. He played himself on The Simpsons and was depicted on Family Guy and South Park. Eddie Redmayne played Hawking in a biopic.

In recent years he looked away from the depths of the universe and into humanity’s future, joining the technologist Elon Musk in warning against the dangers of intelligent computers. “Unless we learn how to prepare for, and avoid, the potential risks, AI could be the worst event in the history of our civilization,” Hawking reportedly said at a talk last year. “It brings dangers, like powerful autonomous weapons, or new ways for the few to oppress the many. It could bring great disruption to our economy.” In an interview with WIRED UK, he said: “Someone will design AI that replicates itself. This will be a new form of life that will outperform humans.”

In 2016 he said that he thought humanity only had about 1,000 years left, thanks to AI, climate change, and other (avoidable) disasters. Last year he reduced that horizon exponentially—100 years left, he warned, unless we changed our ways.

Hawking was taking an unusual step away from cosmology, and it was easy, perhaps, to dismiss that fear—why would someone who’d help define what a singularity actually was warn people against the pseudo-singularity of Silicon Valley? Maybe Hawking will be as wrong on this one as he was about conservation of information in black holes. But Hawking always did see into realms no one else could—until he described them to the rest of us.

Hawking's Influence

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Stephen Hawking dead: Eddie Redmayne, more celebrities react to his death

The famed British theoretical physicist Stephen Hawking died in the early hours of March 13 at the age of 76, a family spokesperson said.

Hawking, who was wheelchair-bound and lived most of his life with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), also known as Lou Gehrig’s Disease, was best known for his work with black holes, quantum gravity and relativity, among other things.

The scientist also taught mathematics and physics and famously wrote the best-selling science book, “A Brief History of Time.”

Many celebrities have given their condolences to Hawking’s family, including actor Eddie Redmayne, who portrayed Hawking in 2014 in the movie “The Theory of Everything.”

“We have lost a truly beautiful mind, an astonishing scientist and the funniest man I have ever had the pleasure to meet. My love and thoughts are with his extraordinary family,” the actor said in a statement.

Read on for a look at other celebrity reactions.

Thank you, Stephen Hawking. ❤️

A post shared by Jim Parsons (@therealjimparsons) on

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Secretary DeVos Issues Full Forgiveness of HBCU Hurricane Relief Loans

Today U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos announced full forgiveness of the hurricane relief loans provided to four Historically Black Colleges and Universities after Hurricanes Katrina and Rita struck the Gulf Coast in 2005.

“This additional disaster relief will lift a huge burden and enable the four HBCUs to continue their focus on serving their students and communities,” said DeVos. “This relief provides one more step toward full recovery.”

‘I haven’t achieved much recently’: Albert Einstein’s private fears revealed in sister’s archive

The celebrated scientist frets about fame and his brain going off with age in candid, soon to be auctioned correspondence with his sister, Maja

A glimpse at the private, hidden face of Albert Einstein, including the celebrated scientists thoughts on everything from his fears that his best work was behind him to his equivocal feelings about his fame, has been revealed in a cache of letters he wrote to his beloved younger sister, Maja.

The collection, which includes a previously unknown photograph of Einstein as a five-year-old and the only surviving letter written by Einstein to his father, comes from the archive of Maja Winteler-Einstein and her husband Paul Winteler. A mix of letters, postcards and photographs, many of which have not previously been published, the documents range in date from 1897 to 1951.

The only surviving letter from Albert Einstein to his father, estimated to sell for 2,500-3,500. Photograph: Yves Gerard/Christie’s Images Ltd 2018

Whats remarkable about them stems from the fact that he had this incredibly close relationship with his sister. Its quite clear when hes writing to her, theres no role-playing at all, said Thomas Venning at Christies, which will auction the letters at the start of May. He was very conscious of what was expected of him after he became famous, and you dont get any of that in letters to his sister. He says some things that Ive never seen him say anywhere else, and Ive catalogued many hundreds of his letters.

In 1924, nine years after he completed the general theory of relativity in 1915, Einstein would write to Maja that scientifically I havent achieved much recently the brain gradually goes off with age, although thats not so unpleasant. It also means that youre not so answerable for your later years. Ten years later, he would write to her: I am happy in my work, even if in this and in other matters I am starting to feel that the brilliance of younger years is past.

Venning said he had not seen Einstein admit this anywhere else. Its not him playing a role, you can see that thought going through his head. Which is true if Einstein had died in 1916, his fundamental legacy would have been intact. He carried on working for another 40 years without making any other great breakthroughs. So its just an extraordinary moment which we get because of how close their relationship was. He didnt have to reassure her, he said.

Tackling topics from his hobbies of sailing and playing the violin, to his difficult relationship with his first wife, the letters are unpublished snapshots of Einstein, his private face, according to Venning. In one from 1935, Einstein makes a rare acknowledgement of his achievements, writing to Maja: In our main avenues of research in physics we are in a situation of groping in the dark, where each is completely sceptical about what another is pursuing with the highest hopes. One is in a constant state of tension until the end. At least I have the comfort that my main achievements have become part of the foundations of our science.

It sounds unusually big-headed for Einstein he was an incredibly low-key, humble person, always careful not to say anything that sounded too proud. But I think he felt he could say something to Maja, said Venning.

In 1923, in a letter that Christies has valued between 6,000 and 9,000, Einstein writes to Maja of his international fame, telling his sister and her husband that I am becoming very much loved and even more envied; theres nothing to be done about it.

Hes not rejoicing in it, hes just sort of accepting it. Einstein was the first scientist to be a world celebrity. Before that it just didnt really happen to scientists, so he was in this unique position, said Venning.

I am becoming very much loved and even more envied; theres nothing to be done about it … Einstein to Maja and Paul Winteler, 15 April 1923. Photograph: Christie’s Images 2018 Ltd

The shadow cast by the rise of the Nazis in the 1930s, and the strength Einstein drew from his work, is starkly depicted in a letter written to his sister in September 1933. Earlier that year, Einstein had renounced his German citizenship in Antwerp, fearing for his life after the Nazis branded relativity Jewish science and publicly denounced him. He took up a role at Princeton University in New Jersey in October; his sister would follow him in 1939.

What will happen if we come back from Princeton next year? Will we even be able to? What will life be like there? The only unshakeable things are the stars and mathematics, he wrote.

This is him facing up to the fact his whole life has changed. Hes going to a country he doesnt really know. And so his whole world is falling to pieces, and he says this wonderful line, said Venning.

Christies will put the letters on view to the public from 18 to 20 April, and auction the collection online from 2 to 9 May.

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Prepared Remarks to the National Parent Teacher Association Legislative Conference

Thank you, Jim, for that kind introduction and for your leadership of this fine organization. I appreciate the opportunity to be with all of you and the chance to get out the Department for a minute – the early signs of spring are promising food for the soul!
I know you must appreciate this opportunity to gather and learn from each other, and to return to your communities, your schools, and your homes reenergized and refocused on our main motivation: individual students.

DeVos Announces Additional Funds to Support Students at Colleges and Universities Impacted by Hurricanes

WASHINGTON — U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos announced the reallocation of $22.9 million in unexpended funds to assist students at colleges and universities located in Federal Emergency Management Agency-declared major disaster areas impacted by hurricanes Harvey, Irma and Maria, as well as postsecondary schools across the nation that have enrolled a significant number of students from the affected areas.