Unravelling Ropes Into Fractal-Like Patterns (10 Photos)

In an ongoing series of artworks entitled ‘Ciclotramas‘, Brazilian artist Janaina Mello Landini unravels ropes into incredible fractal patterns that evoke tree roots, river basins, lightning strikes and circulatory systems.

Landini has been developing this concept since 2010, using threads and strings to create site-specific installations that occupy the space in an immersive way. She adds:

The idea is to “unstitch†Time from its inside, unraveling the threads of the same rope in constant bifurcations, until the last indivisible stage is reached, a point that holds everything together in perfect equilibrium.

Below you will find our favourite Ciclotramas but be sure to check out her website for additional shots and dozens of more examples. Janaina is represented by the Zipper Gallery in São Paulo, Brazil

Janaina Mello Landini
Website | Gallery Representation

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Janaina Mello Landini
Website | Gallery Representation

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Janaina Mello Landini
Website | Gallery Representation

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Janaina Mello Landini
Website | Gallery Representation

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Janaina Mello Landini
Website | Gallery Representation

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Janaina Mello Landini
Website | Gallery Representation

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Janaina Mello Landini
Website | Gallery Representation

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Janaina Mello Landini
Website | Gallery Representation

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Janaina Mello Landini
Website | Gallery Representation

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Janaina Mello Landini
Website | Gallery Representation

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Janaina Mello Landini
Website | Gallery Representation

Read more: http://twistedsifter.com/2017/11/unravelling-ropes-into-fractal-like-patterns/

Next da Vinci? Math whiz uses formulas to create fantastical works of art

(CNN)

If (cos(6k/2000)-i cos(12k/2000))e^(3i/4) means nothing to you, then you’re probably like the rest of us. Normal.
    The last time “cos” resonated with you, was during high school math– when it meant “cosine,” a trigonometric function…of some sort.
    But to 25-year-old Iranian student Hamid Naderi Yeganeh, using cosines are a part of daily life — what you would expect of a mathematics major and award-winning mathlete.

    Math

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    Explorations have led to new animations
    Yeganeh’s work with circles and line segments is expanding to include animations. Beyond that, he’s beginning to think in 3-D, creating sculptures made of fractals.
    “The power of mathematics is unlimited. There’s an infinite number of great artworks that we can create,” he says.

    Read more: http://www.cnn.com/2015/09/17/arts/math-art/index.html